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National Trust Worcestershire

NATIONAL TRUST WORCESTERSHIRE

Rosedene

This red-brick cottage remains largely unchanged since it was first occupied by early Chartists. The Victoria era was a time of remarkable British political change, which is brought back to life at Rosedene.

An organic garden and orchard, full of seasonal fruit and vegetables, flourishes at the back of the house. This plot of land would have originally been allocated to the first occupants of the house for cultivation to supplement their diet and income.


Clent Hills

Explore the miles of footpaths, bridleways and easy access trails offering breathtaking panoramic views over the Cotswolds, Shropshire Hills and Welsh borders.

Wonder at the 18th-century follies which form the backdrop to the picturesque Hagley Hall.

Walk to Walton Hill, a little off the beaten track, for a more tranquil area. Find peace and quiet or get closer to nature at the wildlife hide; Walton Hill is an important area for breeding birds and rare insects.

Discover the myths, legends, bloody battles and early tourism ventures in the region.


Croome

There’s more than meets the eye at Croome. A secret wartime airbase, now a visitor centre, was once a hub of activity for thousands of people. Outside is the grandest of English landscapes, ‘Capability’ Brown’s masterful first commission, with commanding views over the Malverns. The parkland was nearly lost, but is now great for walks and adventures with a surprise around every corner. At the heart of the park lies Croome Court, once home to the Earls of Coventry with four floors to explore. The 6th Earl of Coventry was an 18th century trend-setter and today Croome follows his lead by using artists and craftspeople in the house to tell the story of its eclectic past in inventive ways, perfect for making new discoveries.


The Fleece Inn

The Fleece Inn is a half-timbered medieval farmhouse which originally sheltered a farmer and his stock.

The Inn was first licensed in 1848. Fully restored to its former glory, with witches circles and precious pewter collection, it has developed a reputation for traditional folk music, morris dancing and asparagus.


Greyfriars’ House and Garden

Greyfriars was built in 1480 by a wealthy merchant, it became a home to wealthy families up until the 17th century and in 1699 a baker purchased the lease and divided the house into two.  It became a mixture of homes, shops and businesses for next 200 years. Trade varied and included clothing, hats, bread, leather goods, umbrellas and china riveting.  Over the years buildings were added and extended inlcuding 10 cottages in the back yard.


Hanbury Hall and Gardens

A country retreat in the heart of Worcestershire. The house and garden, originally a stage-set for summer parties, offer a glimpse into life at the turn of the 18th century. Don’t miss the original wall-paintings by Sir James Thornhill. Full of drama and politics, they show the birth of Georgian society.

The original formal gardens, designed by George London, have been faithfully re-created and complement the relaxed later gardens, with orangery, orchards and walled garden. If you venture further afield, our walks leaflet will help you find George London’s visionary Semicircle in the parkland — the beginning of the landscape movement


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